Every couple of years, it seems the world is in peril by a nuclear threat. It is up to Ethan Hunt and his Impossible Mission Force to handle it. However, with Mission: Impossible – Fallout, like all the other films, it seems that Hunt himself is usually the cause of all the problems. This installment of the franchise is no exception. Hunt’s actions now put the world in peril with a known arms dealer and their need to find these weapons of mass destruction.


Christopher McQuarrie returns to the franchise as writer and director the film. A point of note, you will need to see Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation as the film picks up two years after the previous film. It seems that the Rogue Nation did not collapse with the capture of Soloman Lane. The Apostles are planning to return the world to its beginning to start anew.

Always That Type of Plot

Yes, we know that is a trope used in countless worldwide overthrow films before it. We would see it most commonly in James Bond films, as the villain sets itself up as its new ruler. However, in this version, that doesn’t seem to be the case. In an attempt to save a member of his own team, the nuclear cores disappear and it is up to him to find them. Unfortunately, the CIA doesn’t believe in Hunt of their little band of IMF personnel. Erika Sloane (Angela Bassett) assigns her guy, August Walker (Henry Cavill) to accompany him in search of the cores.

As with many of these films, it is a mission to find out who is working against them. Dealings and double dealings. However, it seems to be a way of the franchise to close the circle on Hunt and his past that was started in Mission: Impossible III. The reintroduction of Julia (Michelle Monaghan) into Ethan’s life and is a proper sendoff to her character. It is a novel concept to actually fill in the gaps of their past and break-up, rather than just leaving it alone.
That on top of the sexual tension between Hunt and the returning Ilsa Faust (Rebecca Ferguson) as the paid assassin for MI6. Their relationship is explored quite intimately in this installment after the fine performance and addition of the character in Rogue Nation. Giving her character a depth of romantic feelings for Hunt managed to humanize both of them. Pushing Hunt to greater acts of heroism (or lunacy) to save both women he loves.

Those Stunts

Speaking of lunacy, the stunts in this film are far superior to the previous installment. For me, it always felt that Rogue Nation seemed a bit smaller of a film. Fallout managed to give the franchise a James Bond feel in scope and stylized action. Knowing that Tom Cruise performs many of his own stunts gives the audience a sense of investment. The appreciation to the lengths he will go to for the enjoyment of the audience. This movie managed to raise the bar higher and higher in each action sequence.
The original Mission: Impossible and the third film remain my all-time favorites. However, Fallout managed to be the far more entertaining. More satisfying film of the entire franchise. Cruise used more of his comedic chops in this film, allowing his character to lighten up a bit. He is still driven as he was in previous films. However, he manages to show how much he is not in control. Unfortunately for our national security, is much of the time.